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Sunday, January 18, 2015

MAS COURT MATERIALS



FORGOT TO POST THIS... A GREAT READ RE THE ARCE V HUPPENTHAL ANTI-ETHNIC STUDIES TRIAL:

If you haven't seen them, here are the materials submitted in the 9th circuit case regarding Arizona's ban on Ethnic Studies (HB 2281: regardless of what the courts say, many of us will never recognize this immoral state measure as a "law.") https://turtletalk.wordpress.com/…/ninth-circuit-materials…/

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Raza Studies at the 9th Circuit


Just finished listening to the arguments before the 9th Circuit re Raza Studies.. it is surreal that a program/discipline could be on trial... more on this shortly: http://www.ca9.uscourts.gov/media/view.php?pk_id=0000013827

Friday, January 2, 2015

ARIZONA MOVES AGAINST RAZA AND AFRICAN AMERICAN KNOWLEDGE



BREAKING NEWS!!! THIS IS BEYOND OUTRAGEOUS!!! THESE ARE HUPPENTHAL'S LAST DAYS IN OFFICE AND WANTS TO GO OUT WITH A BANG! ANOTHER ATTACK AGAINST RAZA AND AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDENTS IN TUCSON. PLEASE SHARE/FORWARD/TWEET/ AND STAY TUNED. THIS IS AN ESCALATION AS DURING THE ASSAULT ON ETHNIC STUDIES, THEY HAD LEFT ALONE AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES. NOT ANYMORE!

Arizona Department of Education
Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction John Huppenthal
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Sally Stewart
602-542-5072
Sally.Stewart@azed.gov
SUPERINTENDENT HUPPENTHAL FINDS
TUCSON UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT NONCOMPLIANT
PHOENIX, Ariz., Jan. 2, 2015 – The Arizona Department of Education (ADE) today sent a notice of noncompliance to the Tucson Unified School District stating that one or more of its classes are in violation of A.R.S. §15-112. If the District is not in compliance with A.R.S. § 15-112 by March 4, 2015, ADE will determine whether to withhold 10 percent of the monthly apportionment of state aid that would otherwise be due to the district until the violations are corrected.

Superintendent of Public Instruction John Huppenthal released the following statement today on his finding that the Tucson Unified School District (TUSD) is in violation of A.R.S. § 15-112:
“During my tenure as Superintendent, I have been closely monitoring the status of the Tucson Unified School District’s culturally relevant curricula to ensure that all TUSD students, regardless of their race or ethnic background, have access to a high quality education.
“After a thorough review of materials from TUSD’s culturally relevant courses, I find that the district has failed to meet several provisions of the 2012 Settlement Agreement settlement and is once again in clear violation of A.R.S. §15-112. Furthermore, I am deeply concerned by the fact that the noncompliance appears to extend beyond classes taught from the Mexican American perspective and now also includes classes taught from the African American perspective.
“ADE staff has worked tirelessly to provide guidance and feedback as quickly as possible throughout the process so that district officials would have the resources needed to keep all culturally relevant courses in compliance with the law. This process has been made challenging by the fact that the district has failed to fully respond to several requests for information and has been inconsistent in its application of materials that have been provided.
“In issuing this finding before classes resume, I am hopeful that the district will take immediate action to comply with the law.”

Saturday, November 15, 2014

THE 7,000-YEAR STORY OF MAIZ ON TORTILLAS:


THE 7,000-YEAR STORY OF MAIZ ON TORTILLAS: A year ago, Acapulco Tortillas in East LA, placed the story of maiz (that I wrote) on its tortillas. It is in 3 languages. Everytime I return to LA, I pick some up. They put the story on their Habanero and Spinach tortillas... the original idea was to put them on their corn tortillas. Still may happen, though now, looking at possibility of putting the front cover of my book (by Laura V. Rodriguez) on the front of their [special edition] tortillas. Truthfully, the cover belongs on an Indigenous/organic tortilla. May happen. Will keep everyone posted. The Nahuatl translation is from Paula Paola Domingo. The story: "Corn: It is who we are. It is where we come from and what we are made of. It is our sacred sustenance. It forms part of our ancient memory that goes back 7,000 years to this very continent. It is what connects us to our Mother Earth." Please let me know if you would like to see this happen. There's a cost involved and may have to raise it. Was thinking this should be done for May(May 3) when el dia del maiz was/is traditionally celebrated. (The Catholic changed May 3 to Dia de la Santa Cruz).

Monday, October 13, 2014

Truthout Review: Our Sacred Maíz Is Our Mother: Indigeneity and Belonging in the Americas


Our Sacred Maíz Is Our Mother: Indigeneity and Belonging in the Americas, by Roberto Cintli Rodriguez, The University of Arizona Press, 2014, 288 pages with nine color illustrations, $35.00 paperback. Electronic edition available.
Indigenous people have resisted colonialism in many ways - holding fast to traditional foods, like maíz, performing ancestral dances and songs, and passing legends from generation to generation.
According to a legend told by elders throughout Nahuatl-speaking regions of Mexico, corn - maíz in Spanish and cintli in Nahuatl - has been a dietary staple for thousands of years. The how and why of this development has been passed from generation to generation, and, as recounted in Roberto Contli Rodriguez's Our Sacred Maíz Is Our Mother, goes something like this: Shortly after the Creator couple, Quilaztli and Quetzalcoatl, formed human beings, they realized that their invention could not survive without eating. "Quetzalcoatl - bringer of civilization - was put in charge of bringing food to the people. Walking along," Rodriguez writes, "Quetzalcoatl noticed red ants carrying kernels of corn. Quetzalcoatl asked one of them, 'What is that on your back?'
'Cintli,' one replied. 'It is our sustenance.'"
Quetzalcoatl had further questions, but the ant was leery about revealing too much. Still, Quetzalcoatl persisted, explaining that without nutrients, humans would perish. "Reluctantly," Rodriguez reports, "the ant pointed toward Tonalcatepetl - a nearby mountain - also called The Mountain of Sustenance," and ultimately led Quetzalcoatl to this revered place. Later, after the Lords of Tamoanchan gave their blessing to maíz, corn became indispensable to many of the earth's people.
Throughout the text, Rodriguez tells other stories to illustrate the centrality of maíz in contemporary Mexican and Central American life, whether people are living in the United States or further south. "Maíz is who you are, who we are," he was told time and again as he did his research. "We not only eat maíz; we are maíz."
Indeed, some of the creation stories Rodriguez tells involve attempts to fashion sentient beings from amber, mud and wood. It was only during the final attempt, we're told - when the Creators used corn - that the effort succeeded. Not only that, as people evolved and began to cultivate maíz, they discovered its connection to "various phenomena caused by the sun, moon and universe," among them the concept of time. This, Rodriguez writes, led to the development of a calendar and an understanding of seasons and weather.
For the rest of the review, go to:
http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/26673-maiz-culture-in-the-americas-resisting-colonialism-through-indigenous-tradition